Some New Year Cheer!

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New Years Cheer

Have a Happy and Cheerful New Years Eve!
Remember to celebrate responsibly

We Wish you a Merry Christmas!

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Merry Christmas from all of us at KarateTraining.org to all of You!
Merry Christmas

Enjoy the Magic!

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May the magic of this Holiday fill you with Joy…
Merry Christmas Eve

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Happy Thanksgiving

Kyokushin Union 2006 News

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The AuKyokushin Union 2006ssies better watch out for this trio from New Zealand! From left, Karain Eketone, Ben Terekia and Michael Terekia, are headed to the full-contact Kyokushin Union 2006 Australian national championship on August 26th. Three-dan black belt karate sensei Ben Terekia, son Michael (brown belt) and student Karain Eketone (green belt) of the Turanganui Kyokushin Karate club, located near Gisborne, have been selected in a 25-strong New Zealand team (no other information is available yet on the other 22 members) that will attend. Earlier this year Michael Terekia competed in the Mas Oyama Kyokushin Karate tournament, another full-contact tournament held in Wanganui, New Zealand. He placed second in the colts division, after narrowly losing to his black belt opponent after three gruelling extensions.
Good luck to the Trio as they head to what promises to be a fierce competition, OSU!

The Battle of Boyne

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The Battle of Boyne
The following is a repost
No year in Irish history is better known than 1690. No Irish battle is more famous than William III’s victory over James II at the River Boyne, a few miles west of Drogheda. James, a Roman Catholic, had lost the throne of England in the bloodless “Glorious Revolution” of 1688. William was Prince of Orange, a Dutch-speaking Protestant married to James’s daughter Mary, and became king at the request of parliament. James sought refuge with his old ally, Louis XIV of France, who saw an opportunity to strike at William through Ireland.

He provided French officers and arms for James, who landed at Kinsale in March 1689. The lord deputy, the Earl of Tyrconnell, King William IIIwas a Catholic loyal to James, and his Irish army controlled most of the island. James quickly summoned a parliament, largely Catholic, which proceeded to repeal the legislation under which Protestant settlers had acquired land.

During the rule of Tyrconnell, the first Catholic viceroy since the Reformation, Protestants had seen their influence eroded in the army, in the courts and in civil government. Only in Ulster did they offer effective resistance. In September 1688, while James was still king, apprentice boys in Londonderry closed the city’s gates to deny admission to a Catholic regiment under Lord Antrim. In April 1689, the city refused to surrender to James’s army, and survived the hardships of a three-month siege before relief came by sea. The Protestants of Enniskillen defended their walled city with equal vigour, and won a number of victories over Catholic troops. Eventually, James withdrew from the northern province.

William could not ignore the threat from Ireland. In August 1689 Marshal Schomberg landed at Bangor with 20,000 troops and, with Ulster secure, pushed south as far as Dundalk. James’s army blocked further progress towards Dublin, but there was no battle and the two armies withdrew to winter quarters. In March 1690 the Jacobite army was strengthened by 7,000 French regulars, but Louis demanded over 5,000 Irish troops in return. The Williamites were reinforced by Danish mercenaries and by English and Dutch regiments. When William himself landed at Carrickfergus on 14 June, he was able to muster an army of 36,000 men. He began the march towards Dublin. There was some resistance near Newry, but the Jacobites soon withdrew to the south bank of the River Boyne.

The battle was fought on 1 July 1690 at a fordable river bend four miles west of Drogheda. The main body of Williamite infantry was concentrated on fording the river at the village of Oldbridge, which was approached by a deep and sheltenng glen. First, however, a detachment of cavalry and infantry made a flanking attack upstream, which forced OrangemenJames to divert troops to prevent his retreat being cut off. William’s army was stronger by at least 10,000 men, but after these troops were drawn off he had three-to-one superiority in the main arena. By mid-afternoon the Jacobite army was in retreat, outpaced by James himself, who rode to Dublin to warn the city of William’s approach. He was in France before the month was out. On 6 July William entered Dublin, where he gave thanks for victory in Christ Church Cathedral.

The Battle of the Boyne is recalled each July in the celebrations of the Orange Order, not on the first day but on “the Twelfth”, for eleven days were lost with the change from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1752. It was not the end of the Williamite campaign, and the King had returned to England before the Dutch general Ginkel’s victory at Aughrim and the formal Irish surrender after the siege of Limerick in 1691. The Treaty of Limerick was not ungenerous to the defeated Catholics, but they were soon to suffer from penal laws designed to reinforce Protestant ascendancy throughout Irish life.

Happy July 4th!!

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Happy July 4th
Happy Jully 4th America!

At the time of the signing of the Declaration of Independence America consisted of 13 colonies under the rule of England’s King George III. Leading up to the signing, there had been growing unrest in the colonies surrounding the taxes (10%) that colonists were required to pay to England. The major objection was “Taxation without Representation” — the colonists had no say in the decisions of English Parliament. (Just a side note…today Americans pay over 60% of their annual income to taxes!! and most don’t complain or vote!!) King George refused to negotiate, instead he sent extra troops to the colonies to help control any rebellion that might be arising. The following timeline will give you a crash course in the history that lead to the signing of the Declaration of Independence and America’s break from British rule.
1774 – The 13 colonies send delegates to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to form the First Continental Congress. While unrest was brewing, the colonies were far from ready to declare war.
April 1775 – King George’s troops advance on Concord, Massachusetts, prompting Paul Revere’s midnight ride that sounded the alarm “The British are coming, the British are coming.” The subsequent battle of Concord, famous for being the “shot heard round the world,” would mark the unofficial beginning of the American Revolution.
May 1776 – After nearly a year of trying to work our their differences with England, the colonies again send delegates to the Second Continental Congress.
June 1776 – Admitting that their efforts were hopeless, a committee was formed to compose the formal Declaration of Independence. Headed by Thomas Jefferson, the committee also included John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Philip Livingston and Roger Sherman.
June 28, 1776 – Jefferson presents the first draft of the declaration to congress.
July 4, 1776 – After various changes to Jefferson’s original draft, a vote was taken late in the afternoon of July 4th. Of the 13 colonies, 9 voted in favor of the Declaration; 2, Pennsylvania and South Carolina voted No; Delaware was undecided and New York abstained. John Hancock, President of the Continental Congress, was the first to sign the Declaration of Independence. It is said that he signed his name “with a great flourish” so “King George can read that without spectacles!”
July 6, 1776 – The Pennsylvania Evening Post is the first newspaper to print the Declaration of Independence.
July 8, 1776 – The first public reading of the declaration takes place in Philadelphia’s Independence Square. The bell in Independence Hall, then known as the “Province Bell” would later be renamed the “Liberty Bell” after its inscription – “Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land Unto All the Inhabitants Thereof.”
August 1776 – The task begun on July 4, the signing of the Declaration of Independence, was not actually completed until August. Nonetheless, the 4th of July has been accepted as the official anniversary of United States independence from Britain.
July 4, 1777 – The first Independence Day celebration takes place! By the early 1800s the traditions of parades, picnics, and fireworks were firmly established as part of American Independence Day culture.

Happy Canada Day!!

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Canada Day celebrates the creation of the dominion of Canada through the British North America Act on July 1, 1867, uniting three British territories — the Province of Canada (southern Ontario and southern Quebec), Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick — into a federation which we now cal Canada! It all started on June 20, 1868, when the Governor General, Lord Monck, signed a proclamation calling upon all Her Majesty’s loving subjects throughout Canada to join in the celebration of the anniversary of the formation of the union of the British North America provinces in a federation under the name of Canada on July 1st. Happy Canada Day!!
Canadian Flag The July 1 holiday was established by statute in 1879, under the name Dominion Day. Dominion Day went largely uncelebrated after that first anniversary.
In 1958 the government began to arrange an annual observation however it still was not a wide spread observance until the mid-70’s. On October 27, 1982, July 1st which was known as “Dominion Day” became “Canada Day”. Since then Canada Day Committees are established in each province and territory to plan, organize and coordinate the Canada Day celebrations locally. Grants are provided by the Department to those committees.
So Canada we at KarateTraining.org would like to wish you a Happy Canada Day!

Memorial Day

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Memorial Day
This year Memorial Day has a double meaning since we just put my good friend to rest who was also a veteren of the Vietnam War. In observance I thought I would post the history of Memorial Day…

In 1865, Henry C. Welles, a druggist in the village of Waterloo, NY, mentioned at a social gathering that honor should be shown to the patriotic dead of the Civil War by decorating their graves.

In the Spring of 1866, he again mentioned this subject to General John B. Murray, Seneca County Clerk. General Murray embraced the idea and a committee was formulated to plan a day devoted to honoring the dead. Townspeople adopted the idea wholeheartedly. Wreaths, crosses and bouquets were made for each veteran’s grave. The village was decorated with flags at half mast and draped with evergreen boughs and mourning black streamers.

It should be noted that as the Civil War was coming to a close in the spring of 1865, Women’s Auxiliaries of the North and South moved from providing relief to the families and soldiers on their own sides to joining in efforts to preserve and decorate the graves of both sides. A woman of French extraction and leader of the Virginia women’s movement, Cassandra Oliver Moncure, took responsibility of coordinating the activities of several groups into a combined ceremony on May 30. It is said that she picked that day because it corresponded to the Day of Ashes in France, a solemn day that commemorates the return of the remains of Napoleon Bonaparte to France from St. Helena.

On May 5, 1866, civic societies joined the procession to the three existing cemeteries and were led by veterans marching to martial music. At each cemetery there were impressive and lengthy services including speeches by General Murray and a local clergyman. The ceremonies were repeated on May 5, 1867. The first official recognition of Memorial Day as such was issued by General John A. Logan, first commander of the Grand Army of the Republic. This was General Order No. 11 establishing “Decoration Day” as it was then known. The date of the order was May 5, 1868, exactly two years after Waterloo’s first observance. That year Waterloo joined other communities in the nation by having their ceremony on May 30.

In 1965, a committee of community leaders started plans for the Centennial Celebration of Memorial Day. The committee consisted of VFW Commander James McCann, chairman, American Legion Commander Oliver J. McFall and Mayor Marion DeCicca, co-chairman, along with Village Trustees, M. Lewis Somerville, Roscoe Bartran, Richard Schreck, Tony DiPronio, and VFW Vice-Commander, Kenneth Matoon. Their goals were: “to obtain national recognition of the fact that Waterloo is the birthplace of Memorial Day through Congressional action” and “to plan and execute a proper celebration for such centennial observance.”
In May of 1966, just in time for the Centennial, Waterloo was recognized as the “Birthplace of Memorial Day” by the United States Government. This recognition was long in coming and involved hours of painstaking research to prove the claim. While other communities may claim earlier observances of honoring the Civil War dead, none can claim to have been so well planned and complete, nor can they claim the continuity of observances that Waterloo can.

The Centennial Celebration that year brought dignitaries from government, military, veteran’s organizations and descendants of the original founders of Memorial Day. A once luxurious home on Waterloo’s Main Street, built in 1850, was purchased from the county and restored. Now the Memorial Day Museum, it houses artifacts of the first Memorial Day and the Civil War era.
Memorial Day is commemorated each year in Waterloo. The parade, speeches, and solemn observances keep the meaning of Memorial Day as it was originally intended to be. Other communities throughout the United States also lay claim Memorial Day. While Waterloo, NY has been sanctioned by the U.S. Government as being the birthplace, other communities have interesting and touching stories concerning their first observance. Among these communities is Boalsburg, PA.

Seeking favor through goodwill…

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Japan has invited eight members of the Iraqi Karate Federation and its Al-Muthanna branch on May 28 to June 7, intending to strengthen goodwill toward Japan in Iraq through sports. During their stay, the visitors, with the cooperation of the Japan Karatedo Federation, the Japan Defense Agency (JDA) and others will pay courtesy calls to government officials and tour Tokyo; participate in training at universities in Tokyo, and; the Physical Training School of the Self Defense Forces (SDF) and give karate demonstrations at the 45th All SDF Karate Championship. According to Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, “This project is being implemented at a time when there is increasing interest in karate in Iraq, mainly in Samawah, thanks to the interchange between the Ground Self Defense Force units dispatched to Iraq and karate players in Al-Muthanna, as well as through efforts by the Japanese side, including the provision of karate equipment by the Japan Karatedo Federation“. The Japanese government expects this visit to enhance friendly relations with Iraq and Iraqis’ understanding toward Japan will be deepened through the spirit of martial arts of karate, Japanese traditional sport. While I think this is a good program that will benefit the Iraqis I doubt it will create much good wll with anyone other then the eight participants and a few of their friends and family!