Taikyoku 2 (Ni)

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Master Gichin Funakoshi (Shotokan) derived the three Taikyoku kata from northern Chinese kempo and Shorin Ryu, the Okinawan karate style based on Chinese Shaolin (i.e. “Shorin”) kempo. Mas Oyama in turn adapted these for Kyokushin as he trained under Master Funakoshi. The Taikyuko kata utilize long, powerful stances and strong blocks and strikes. The Taiyoku Kata set includes:

  • Taikyoku Sono Ichi, Ni and San

Meanings of Taikyoku is literally translated as “grand ultimate”, and in Chinese, the kanji characters are pronounced Tai Chi. The word Taikyoku can also mean overview or the whole point – seeing the whole rather than focusing on the individual parts, and keeping an open mind or beginner’s mind. The beginner’s mind is what is strived for during training and in life. The beginner’s mind does not hold prejudice and does not cling to a narrow view. The beginner’s mind is open to endless possibilities.

Taikyoku 2 (the details):

Contains: 20 Movements
Should take: About 40 seconds to perform (Kata Speed)

These next two images to help you understand the movements of the kata:

taikyoku1sttaikyoku2nd
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This next image shows the movement described below:
2-taikyoku-nidan

Step-by-Step Directions:
As always, begin the Kata in Attention Stance, with feet together, hands at your side and eyes forward. Every Kata begins and ends from this stance with a bow. This kata starts from a open stance after the bow with hands in ready position.

1. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
2. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
3. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK
4. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
5. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
6. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
7. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
8. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST (KEI)
9. 270 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
10. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST.
11. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
12. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
13. LEFT 90 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
14. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
15. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
16. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST (KEI)
17. 270 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
18. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
19. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
20. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST (KEI)
CLOSE. BRING LEFT FOOT BACK AND BOW.

Still not sure, here is a video to help:

A Little Crazy is a Lot Scary

ktadmin Post in Fun Stuff, Self-Defense,Tags: , , , ,
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I aways tell my students to do the unexpected in a dangerous situation, as surprise is your best ally. Sometimes you have to get s little crazy to gain the surprise advantage, plus it can help calm your panic through action. I saw this and thought (for men) it doesn’t get more scary than that!
the love defenseThis is not a suggested self-defense method!!

Tie that Belt like a Pro

ktadmin Post in Karate, Technique,Tags: , ,
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Everyone seems to have trouble with this (except perhaps Boyscouts!) but it is really easy once you know how to do it (like everything!)

Here is the step-by-step instructions:

tie-belt

Can they disarm us?

ktadmin Post in Politics, Self-Defense,Tags: , , , ,
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This the strongest 2nd amendment argument I have heard, that explains what is happening today…

Ultimately, they can only disarm us if we let them…

And if that doesn’t put things in perspective, try these “numbers” on for size:

Keep your head in the game

ktadmin Post in A Zen Thing, State of Mind, Training notes,Tags: , , , ,
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Your Legs are not giving out;
Your Mind is giving up.

Defeat is easy. There are always a million excuses lying around for you to grab onto. We typically defeat ourselves, but that moment before we allow defeat there is an opportunity to be better than you are. Face it your mind wants to give up before my body does, all you need to do is utter the phrase…I can’t… Be better than you are, say yes I can, instead and tough it out. This applies during Training, on the Mat or in Life.

Keep your head in the game, say I can…and believe it. If you truly can’t, you need to be honest about why not and work to overcome the reason. “I can’t” means you won’t because it is the easier way. Take the road less travelled, …because you can…

Taikyoku 1

ktadmin Post in Karate, Styles, Technique, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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Master Gichin Funakoshi (Shotokan) derived the three Taikyoku kata from northern Chinese kempo and Shorin Ryu, the Okinawan karate style based on Chinese Shaolin (i.e. “Shorin”) kempo.  Mas Oyama in turn adapted these for Kyokushin as he trained under Master Funakoshi.  The Taikyuko kata utilize long, powerful stances and strong blocks and strikes. The Taiyoku Kata set includes:

  • Taikyoku Sono Ichi, Ni and San

Meanings of Taikyoku is literally translated as “grand ultimate”, and in Chinese, the kanji characters are pronounced Tai Chi. The word Taikyoku can also mean overview or the whole point – seeing the whole rather than focusing on the individual parts, and keeping an open mind or beginner’s mind. The beginner’s mind is what is strived for during training and in life. The beginner’s mind does not hold prejudice and does not cling to a narrow view. The beginner’s mind is open to endless possibilities.

Taikyoku 1 (the details):

Contains: 20 Movements
Should take: About 40 seconds to perform (Kata Speed)

These next two images to help you understand the movements of the kata:

taikyoku1sttaikyoku2nd
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This next image shows the movement described below:
Taikyoku 1

Step-by-Step Directions:
As always, begin the Kata in Attention Stance, with feet together, hands at your side and eyes forward.  Every Kata begins and ends from this stance with a bow.  This kata starts from a open stance after the bow with hands in ready position.

1. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
2. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
3. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK
4. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
5. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
6. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
7. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
8. STEP, DO A MID THRUST (KEI)
9. 270 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
10. STEP, DO A MID THRUST.
11. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
12. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
13. LEFT 90 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
14. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
15. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
16. STEP, DO A MID THRUST (KEI)
17. 270 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
18. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
19. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
20. STEP, DO A MID THRUST (KEI)
CLOSE. BRING LEFT FOOT BACK AND BOW.

Still not sure, here is a video to help:

Why we practice

ktadmin Post in A Zen Thing, Karate, State of Mind, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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Often we forget why we practice so much.  When that happens we become complacent and that is when bad things happen.  To often we think we can put off our training until tomorrow.  We practice today so we are prepared today, not tomorrow when it might be to late.

I am reminded of this truth today as I anticipate surgery I will have this coming week.  I have been complacent lately mostly because of my injury; but that is no excuse.  We live in an increasingly dangerous world, tomorrow is not the time to prepare.  This graphic reminded me of that.  Even though I may be limited in my physical training over the next few weeks, I can continue to train and will strive to do so…

sweat_or_bleed

Afraid of what?

ktadmin Post in A Zen Thing, Awareness, Quotes, State of Mind,Tags: , , , , , ,
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You can do anything if you’re not afraid.  – from the movie “Daredevil” (2003)

Well almost anything.  Let us remember this is a quote from a movie.  And not a very good movie either starring Ben Affleck.  Regardless the quote bares further contemplation.

Everyone is afraid of something, unless they are insane.  Some are afraid of the dark, some water, some spiders or snakes.  Even the most fearless warrior is afraid of something, even if he never shows it.  There is a difference between being afraid and appearing afraid.  Each has its place.  Fear is a normal response to things that are new, unexpected or we have been conditioned to fear.  I’ll admit it, I am afraid of spiders.  My fear stems from being forced, by my parents, into a spiderweb filled storage crawl space under my childhood home 2-3 times a year.  I had to crawl into the 3 foot high, dirt floor space a good 4 feet to reach the chain on the light.  There were spiders everywhere.  Even though I know where my fear comes from and I can mostly control it, and I understand spiders aren’t usually the bad guys, the fear is still there.  You won’t know it if you throw one in my lap, but my pulse will elevate!

Controlling fear is the key to success.  When we spar we begin with a fear of being hit, this leads us to flinch and thereby typically lose the match.  As we train and gain more self-control we learn to control our fear and thereby our flinch, so we might begin to win a few matches.  The fear however is constant as hopefully no one likes to get hit.  The fear will lessen but that is because we are masters of the fear instead of the fear mastering us.  The path to self-control and controlling your fear starts with an act of sheer will, the decision that you are not going to flinch or run screaming like a girl!  (Sorry girls)

There you have it, boil it all down and fear is a decision.  Following the Sept 11th attack on the World Trade Centers, many of the people trapped in the buildings chose not to be afraid of what they knew was about to happen.  Instead a few of them called loved ones to share a final moment, one such caller was described as calm.  I am sure others were consumed by fear, for themselves or their loved ones.  None of us can say with honesty or certainty how we would react in a similar situation.  We react to fear based on the situation, on our state of mind, on so many factors, but if we train to control our fears beginning in the sparring ring we will be better equip to face and handle our fears when they catch us unaware.

If you are a person of faith I would add fear, like worry, is a lack of faith.

Consequences

ktadmin Post in Awareness, Video,Tags: , ,
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Our actions have consequences and those consequences impact lives.  I have seen families destroyed, friends dead, and crippled.  Recently a friend was seriously injured as the result of someone else’s actions.  Recovering from surgery his life may never be the way it was.  Fortunately in this case no children were involved.  Consequences impact lives, sometime those of innocent bystanders.  This 1 minute video should give us all pause to reflect on the consequences of our actions.

Notice there is plenty of blame to go around, actions, consequences.

All’s Fair…

ktadmin Post in Fun Stuff, Styles, Technique,Tags: , , , ,
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There are no rules in a fight, we ask who won, not who fought the best…After all; all is fair in love and war.

As most of my students know I rarely look at them when we are sparring.  I look past them, to their sides, up or down, I have my reasons but initially the students see this as a weakness, they quickly learn it is actually my advantage.  Since I didn’t have time for a long post today I thought I’d use the following graphic to demonstrate what I mean.

ping-pong

Plus I find this insanely funny, just makes me giggle every time!  Perhaps I should get some more sleep…