Posts Tagged ‘kyu’

Taikyoku 3 (San)

ktadmin Posted in Styles, Technique, Training notes,Tags: , , , ,
0

Master Gichin Funakoshi (Shotokan) derived the three Taikyoku kata from northern Chinese kempo and Shorin Ryu, the Okinawan karate style based on Chinese Shaolin (i.e. “Shorin”) kempo. Mas Oyama in turn adapted these for Kyokushin as he trained under Master Funakoshi. The Taikyuko kata utilize long, powerful stances and strong blocks and strikes. The Taiyoku Kata set includes:

  • Taikyoku Sono Ichi, Ni and San

Meanings of Taikyoku is literally translated as “grand ultimate”, and in Chinese, the kanji characters are pronounced Tai Chi. The word Taikyoku can also mean overview or the whole point – seeing the whole rather than focusing on the individual parts, and keeping an open mind or beginner’s mind. The beginner’s mind is what is strived for during training and in life. The beginner’s mind does not hold prejudice and does not cling to a narrow view. The beginner’s mind is open to endless possibilities.

Taikyoku 3 (San) (the details):

Contains: 20 Movements
Should take: About 40 seconds to perform (Kata Speed)

These next two images to help you understand the movements of the kata:

taikyoku1sttaikyoku2nd
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This next image shows the movement described below:
3-taiktoku-sandan

Step-by-Step Directions:
As always, begin the Kata in Attention Stance, with feet together, hands at your side and eyes forward. Every Kata begins and ends from this stance with a bow. This kata starts from a open stance after the bow with hands in ready position.

1. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, CAT WALK MIDDLE BREAK.
2. STEP INTO A FORWARD STANCE, DO A MID THRUST
3. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, CAT WALK MIDDLE BREAK.
4. STEP INTO A FORWARD STANCE, DO A MID THRUST.
5. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
6. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
7. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
8. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST (KEI)
9. 270 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, CAT WALK MIDDLE BREAK.
10. STEP INTO A FORWARD STANCE, DO A MID THRUST.
11. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, CAT WALK MIDDLE BREAK.
12. STEP INTO A FORWARD STANCE, DO A MID THRUST.
13. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
14. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
15. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST
16. STEP, DO A HIGH THRUST (KEI)
17. 270 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, CAT WALK MIDDLE BREAK.
18. STEP INTO A FORWARD STANCE, DO A MID THRUST.
19. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, CAT WALK MIDDLE BREAK.
20. STEP INTO A FORWARD STANCE, DO A MID THRUST (KEI).
CLOSE. BRING LEFT FOOT BACK AND BOW.

Still not sure…Here is a video to help you along:

The Meaning of the Brown Belt (3rd – 1st Kyu) – Revisited

ktadmin Posted in Articles of Interest, Styles, Training notes,Tags: ,
0

Previously I posted the meaning of the Brown Belt, the first of three brown belts in our Dojo.  I’ve been thinking about this for a while now and have written a different perspective of the meaning here that flows from the meaning presented for the previous two belts.  Here is the revisited meaning, post a comment with your opinion on both:

Now the brown represents the deep brown of fertile soil, so rich it almost looks black.  Ever more fertile the soil works with the heat of the Sun to push the plants growth.  Now a source of nutriment the student needs little assistance in this final step of training.  The training at this stage is just as arduous yet seems easier to the student.  There is a synergy of the physical and mental aspects of the art, things are clearer and seen from many perspectives.  The student is becoming a master.  At this stage there is usually one task left to perfect, one task that is unique to the student.  Like a fertile plot of land in the middle of the wilderness gone is the similarity as they stand distinct from their surroundings.   The student is higher in rank, he/she acquires more detailed knowledge and so the brown belt student learns to be more cautious and humble as his/her knowledge and physical abilities increase.

The Meaning of the Brown Belt – 2nd Kyu

ktadmin Posted in Articles of Interest, Styles, Training notes,Tags: ,
0

Here the student has advanced their skills and their self, having removed much of the parasites, stones and weeds.  Finally the soil is ready for the seeds the student has held until ready.  This begins the first planting of the seeds of their skills and understanding.  This is a critical step in the development of the individual for the soil is not giving life on its own yet but needs external nurturing and nutriment.  The extreme physical requirements continue relentlessly as the student works to protect the fragile first crop.

The Meaning of the Brown Belt – 3rd Kyu

ktadmin Posted in Articles of Interest, Styles, Training notes,Tags: ,
0

At this point the student has mastered the basics and developed deep roots in Kokushin-Kai.  Brown is known as an earthy color, such as dirt or soil.  The brown belt signifies the soil in which the roots of mastery begin to take hold.  This brown signifies virgin soil never worked or perfected, never enriched or aerated. The previous belts provide the seeds however they find themselves unwelcoming soil to foster growth.  Like the task of the farmer to tame the land, so does the student need to begin to their self, to remove the parasites, stones, and weeds.  To let in the Green of life, the Blue of the sky and the power of Purple to make this fertile ground.  This is as great a physical task as it is mental task for the student but no Mastery of the art can be attained without it any more than a seed can grow properly on unwelcome soil.