Posts Tagged ‘training’

Taikyoku 1

ktadmin Posted in Karate, Styles, Technique, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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Master Gichin Funakoshi (Shotokan) derived the three Taikyoku kata from northern Chinese kempo and Shorin Ryu, the Okinawan karate style based on Chinese Shaolin (i.e. “Shorin”) kempo.  Mas Oyama in turn adapted these for Kyokushin as he trained under Master Funakoshi.  The Taikyuko kata utilize long, powerful stances and strong blocks and strikes. The Taiyoku Kata set includes:

  • Taikyoku Sono Ichi, Ni and San

Meanings of Taikyoku is literally translated as “grand ultimate”, and in Chinese, the kanji characters are pronounced Tai Chi. The word Taikyoku can also mean overview or the whole point – seeing the whole rather than focusing on the individual parts, and keeping an open mind or beginner’s mind. The beginner’s mind is what is strived for during training and in life. The beginner’s mind does not hold prejudice and does not cling to a narrow view. The beginner’s mind is open to endless possibilities.

Taikyoku 1 (the details):

Contains: 20 Movements
Should take: About 40 seconds to perform (Kata Speed)

These next two images to help you understand the movements of the kata:

taikyoku1sttaikyoku2nd
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This next image shows the movement described below:
Taikyoku 1

Step-by-Step Directions:
As always, begin the Kata in Attention Stance, with feet together, hands at your side and eyes forward.  Every Kata begins and ends from this stance with a bow.  This kata starts from a open stance after the bow with hands in ready position.

1. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
2. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
3. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK
4. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
5. LEFT 90 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
6. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
7. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
8. STEP, DO A MID THRUST (KEI)
9. 270 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
10. STEP, DO A MID THRUST.
11. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
12. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
13. LEFT 90 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
14. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
15. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
16. STEP, DO A MID THRUST (KEI)
17. 270 DEGREE COUNTER-CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
18. STEP, DO A MID THRUST
19. 180 DEGREE CLOCKWISE TURN, DO A LOW BLOCK.
20. STEP, DO A MID THRUST (KEI)
CLOSE. BRING LEFT FOOT BACK AND BOW.

Still not sure, here is a video to help:

Why we practice

ktadmin Posted in A Zen Thing, Karate, State of Mind, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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Often we forget why we practice so much.  When that happens we become complacent and that is when bad things happen.  To often we think we can put off our training until tomorrow.  We practice today so we are prepared today, not tomorrow when it might be to late.

I am reminded of this truth today as I anticipate surgery I will have this coming week.  I have been complacent lately mostly because of my injury; but that is no excuse.  We live in an increasingly dangerous world, tomorrow is not the time to prepare.  This graphic reminded me of that.  Even though I may be limited in my physical training over the next few weeks, I can continue to train and will strive to do so…

sweat_or_bleed

Afraid of what?

ktadmin Posted in A Zen Thing, Awareness, Quotes, State of Mind,Tags: , , , , , ,
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You can do anything if you’re not afraid.  – from the movie “Daredevil” (2003)

Well almost anything.  Let us remember this is a quote from a movie.  And not a very good movie either starring Ben Affleck.  Regardless the quote bares further contemplation.

Everyone is afraid of something, unless they are insane.  Some are afraid of the dark, some water, some spiders or snakes.  Even the most fearless warrior is afraid of something, even if he never shows it.  There is a difference between being afraid and appearing afraid.  Each has its place.  Fear is a normal response to things that are new, unexpected or we have been conditioned to fear.  I’ll admit it, I am afraid of spiders.  My fear stems from being forced, by my parents, into a spiderweb filled storage crawl space under my childhood home 2-3 times a year.  I had to crawl into the 3 foot high, dirt floor space a good 4 feet to reach the chain on the light.  There were spiders everywhere.  Even though I know where my fear comes from and I can mostly control it, and I understand spiders aren’t usually the bad guys, the fear is still there.  You won’t know it if you throw one in my lap, but my pulse will elevate!

Controlling fear is the key to success.  When we spar we begin with a fear of being hit, this leads us to flinch and thereby typically lose the match.  As we train and gain more self-control we learn to control our fear and thereby our flinch, so we might begin to win a few matches.  The fear however is constant as hopefully no one likes to get hit.  The fear will lessen but that is because we are masters of the fear instead of the fear mastering us.  The path to self-control and controlling your fear starts with an act of sheer will, the decision that you are not going to flinch or run screaming like a girl!  (Sorry girls)

There you have it, boil it all down and fear is a decision.  Following the Sept 11th attack on the World Trade Centers, many of the people trapped in the buildings chose not to be afraid of what they knew was about to happen.  Instead a few of them called loved ones to share a final moment, one such caller was described as calm.  I am sure others were consumed by fear, for themselves or their loved ones.  None of us can say with honesty or certainty how we would react in a similar situation.  We react to fear based on the situation, on our state of mind, on so many factors, but if we train to control our fears beginning in the sparring ring we will be better equip to face and handle our fears when they catch us unaware.

If you are a person of faith I would add fear, like worry, is a lack of faith.

Great Looking Effort, No Real Accomplishment

ktadmin Posted in A Zen Thing, State of Mind, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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Being busy does not always mean real work.
The object of all work is production or
accomplishment and to either of these ends
there must be Forethought, System, Planning,
Intelligence, and Honest Purpose, as well as
Perspiration.  Seeming to do is not doing”

– Thomas Edison

Given the measure of accomplishments Thomas Edison made in his lifetime his words bear listening to, in every arena of your life.  Many of us are simply robots going through the motions of life, busy like bees in a hive, yet what do we accomplish?  We approach everything in this manner.  We workout for 22 minutes because that is what someone told us, no forethought, no real goals.  Take a moment today and think about what you want to accomplish, meaning figure out what your goals are.  Look at how you are going to do this (system and planning).  Make sure your system and plan make sense, not a pie-in-the-sky unintelligent plan but one that is realistic.  Be honest with yourself and your abilities.  It doesn’t take that long to go through these steps!  Now all you need to add is perspiration!

Train Once, Train Often!

Mas Oyama Trained James Bond…Seriously!

ktadmin Posted in History, Karate,Tags: , , , ,
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Mas Oyama, founder of Kyokushin “Ultimate Truth” Karate, trained James Bond star Sean Connery.  Not only did Mas Oyama train Sean Connery, Sean Connery was granted the rank of Black Belt (honorary Shodan)…  Anyone familiar with the militaristic training requirements set by Mas Oyama understands what a momentous accomplishment it was to train with Mas Oyama, so much so that even the Honorary title is impressive.

Don’t believe it Connery know and trained with Mas Oyama..well here is some proof:

Mas Oyama presenting Sean Connery with Honorary Black Belt Certificate in August 1966.

Mas Oyama presenting Sean Connery with Honorary Black Belt Certificate in August 1966.

MasOyama-and-SeanConnery

Mas Oyama with Sean Connery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The gentleman in the second photo next to Sean Connery is Donn Draeger trainer, accomplished Martial Artist and choreographer for the Bond Movies.  standing Mas Oyama and James Bond how cool is that 🙂

Staying in Shape

ktadmin Posted in Fitness, Training notes,Tags: , ,
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OK, I have a life and I am not an obsessed person, which means …I have a life!  I do not live to eat nor do I live to be in perfect shape.  Pathetic some may say but they probably don’t have a life. Or they are independently wealthy!   Yes we all attend Karate class at least once or twice a week but that isn’t enough.

Balancing job, family, chores, and the a sundry other tasks and commitments in your life and there is precious little time left for sleep let alone a 10 mile run (ok 5 mile run)!  But that doesn’t mean we can’t stay in shape we just have to make it part of your day where you can spare a few minutes here and there.  Here is what I do through out the day to help stay in shape.

25-40 pushups
3 sets of 30 second planks (or 30-50 situps)
30-50 lunges (each leg!)
15-30 squats (add a jump when coming up for some additional burn)

On days when I haven’t had any time I do these all before bed as it helps me sleep (I know that doesn’t apply to everyone).  I also find doing these before bed seems to help me burn calories when I sleep or at least the scale seems to reflect that in the morning.

Obviously this should not be all the exercise you get but it is a good start to staying/getting toned.  If you have access to stairs I like to do 10-15 flights for a quick cardio workout.

Start with this, add in as much of your Karate workout as room/time allows for and you will find that you look forward to your little exercise breaks more with eash day.  If you commit to doing this 6 days a week for 3 months it will become part of your daily routine for ever…!

 

A Different Mindset

ktadmin Posted in A Zen Thing, Quotes, State of Mind, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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“It usually takes me more than three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech.” —Mark Twain

In life we are told and taught to be prepared.  Mark Twain’s quote states the obvious, no one knowingly gets up in front of a crowd to speak without preparing!  We prepare for everything from presentation to disasters.  But what about Karate?  Do you prepare to defend yourself?  Honestly, the best you can do is practice and practice some more.  Because unlike a test or a speech, a fight is dynamic, you must rely on instinct and the skills you have practice and hope they are enough.  I guess that is the reality we don’t like to admit, you can never be to prepared and you will never know if you are prepared enough!  Some would take that as license to never prepare, which of course is pure folly.  Some will try to prepare for every possible situation, again pure folly, since I am pretty sure the chances are pretty small I will be fighting a bus load of midget ninja’s any time soon!

The moral of the story is prepare, train, but relax.  If you are training well, when the time comes you will handle any situation with a grace and skill, that will surely surprise you; since I guarantee, you will not have trained or prepared for the situation you encounter!

Train hard, train often!

Controlling your Body

ktadmin Posted in Awareness, Control, Technique, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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The main focus of the Martial Arts is control.  Control of yourself, your body and your situation.  Perfecting a technique or Kata is all about being aware of your bodies position and controlling your bodies movements.  This awareness and control translates into the sparring ring allowing you to become aware of your opponents movements, patterns and ultimately vulnerabilities.  It all starts with control of your own body and movements.  The following video is an excellent example of a man who is in total control of his body and aware of it’s position and movements.  It is not a martial art demonstration but dubstep dancing, watch and be amazed…

The point to sharing this video is control starts with practice if you want to perfect any discipline or technique.  Whether it is Karate, Ballet, Mathematics, a musical instrument or Knitting it all starts with practice.  Practice takes perseverance to find success, so commit to practising everyday so you can find your control and perfection.  You won’t regret it!

Study to Train

ktadmin Posted in Articles of Interest, Control, Karate, State of Mind, Training notes,Tags: , , , , ,
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Why do we train?  Why do we study the Martial Arts?  Why do we do all these forms?  Why don’t we just fight?  Why? Why?

It is the classic question posed in hundreds of films like the Karate Kid.  The answer isn’t as crystal clear and the payout isn’t as dramatic in real life.  In real life Daniel Larusso (played by Ralph Macchio) would have probably lost.  That doesn’t mean he wouldn’t learn the same lessons, but it wouldn’t be a box office success!  This is something however you can’t read about, you have to experience it, even then very few look past the failure to learn anything.  If you are one that does than I commend you, you are on your way to Mastery of, well anything.  Where am I going with all this?

Why do we say study instead of train with respect to the Martial Arts?  Because we train to learn basic skills and physical movements.  We study so we can learn to extend, to go beyond what training alone can teach.  Kind of like the difference between Po and Tai Lung (in Kung Fu Panda), Po studied where Tai Lung trained.  Tai Lung was limited by his physical self.  Whereas Po went beyond his physical self, allowing him to push beyond his physical limits and succeed.  I know that is kind of deep and to some it will sound like rubbish, take from it what you will.

The point is, the martial arts teaches us to look within; evaluate our motives, behavior, beliefs, mindset, in total, our self.  Unfortunately for some this becomes a religious experience, it is not, nor should it be.  The martial arts can exist harmoniously with religion but using it to replace religion is to train without studying.  Ultimately the martial arts teaches us control of the Self.  This is similar to Self-Control but not the same.  When you are angry you demonstrate self-control by not hitting or screaming at the person who angered you.  When you are in control of the Self, you see the anger but are not affected by the anger, you are calm, cool and collected.  Think about a situation, which is more frightening, an opponent who is red in the face with anger or one who is calm, cool and collected?  That is what I thought.  What is it about the calm, cool, collected that you find so unnerving?  When you attain it you will understand that there is nothing and everything to be feared.  Bruce Lee was known for his control of Self.

The Martial Way is not easy.  First come training, which leads to Self-Control, more training opens the mind to Study, which if pursued, leads to control of Self.  Sounds easy enough, just five “simple” steps!!  But the way is hard; the way we live our lives; the society we live in makes it even harder.  There is to much noise in most of our lives, even if we don’t engage it, the noise is all around us (in Western Societies).  The Martial Way is quiet, reflective and simple.  Quiet the opposite of the way the world around us suggests we should live our lives!  Self-control is the first major hurtle and honestly our society and values of instant gratification and worldly pursuits make it a difficult hurtle to master.  Do you have what it takes?  Will power and focus?

What I am describing is not the Martial Arts of the MMA or UFC.  That is not to say those are dishonorable pursuits or lacking in any way, honestly I admire their training and dedication.  But they where the trappings of the world, lots of noise and little control of Self.  Could you see Bruce Lee in a MMA or UFC commercial?  Perhaps.  Regardless of the path you choose, the path always starts the same…Training!  That’s right, get up, stop reading now and Train. (but when you finish training come back to read some more)

First comes Training, so Study to Train!

Results – Get Some

ktadmin Posted in Awareness, Questions, State of Mind, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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The image says it all.  Think about it and then truly ask yourself if you are doing the work to get the results you want?