Posts Tagged ‘Technique’

Board Breaking

Sensei Posted in Fun Stuff, State of Mind, Technique, Training notes, Video,Tags: , , , ,
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Let’s start with a laugh, I like to say I’ve never met a board I didn’t like…
[zdvideo]http://karatetraining.org/weblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/terry-gantner-family-workout.flv[/zdvideo]

Well anyone who has attempted to break a board has experienced this at least once!  Lose your mental focus, feel fear or uncertainty, lose your physical focus and that will probably be you jumping around screaming!

Focus, this is the real trick in the Martial Arts or any fighting art, to much focus (see above) can be a bad thing.  While you may gain power you lose your situational awareness.  Instead of focus you need to train to stay relaxed, aware of your situation and fluid, this will give you the ability to react without the time delay of planned movements.  When I spar I rarely look at my opponent, in other words I do not focus on the person I am fighting.  Instead I relax my focus and heighten my awareness of the entire sparring situation, taking in their whole body or multiple attackers.  This is almost the opposite of what most students are taught when breaking boards.  Yet relaxing your focus can accomplish the same thing with the benefit of not getting tunnel vision.  You are simply putting your fist or knife hand strike to a defined spot, past the object, regardless of the object.

However I’d like to end by saying I have never met a board I didn’t like…

Perhaps I need to rethink that!

Kyokushin Katas

ktadmin Posted in History, Styles, Technique, Training notes,Tags: , , ,
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Kata (forms)

Kata is the synergy or technique and skill.  Kata is a form of ritualized training in which patterned or memorized movements are done in order to practice a form of virtualized combat.  Several kata are also done in “ura” denoted by the ura at the end of the Kata name.  Ura indicates a different pattern of footwork that produces a spin on one foot for almost every move.   The ura versions of the Kata were developed by Mas Oyama to improve balance and agility.

Northern Kata

The northern kata have their origins in Shotokan karate, which Oyama learned while training under Gichin Funakoshi. The URA, or ‘reverse’ kata were developed by Oyama as an aid to developing balance and multi-direction combat skills. (some areas now phase out the prefix “sono”).

    Taikyoku – (one translation: Beginners Mind

  • Taikyoku sono ichi
  • Taikyoku sono ni
  • Taikyoku sono san
    Pinan – (one translation: peace and relaxation

  • Pinan Sono Ichi
  • Pinan Sono Ni
  • Pinan Sono San
  • Pinan Sono yon
  • Pinan Sono Go
  • Kanku-dai – (translation: to view the sky)
  • Sushiho – (translation: 54 steps)

Kyokushin unique Northern Kata

  • Sokugi Taikyoku sono ichi (all leg work)
  • Sokugi Taikyoku sono ni (all leg work)
  • Sokugi Taikyoku sono san (all leg work)
  • Sokugi Taikyoku sono yon (all leg work)
  • Taikyoku sono ichi ura (with spins)
  • Taikyoku sono ni ura (with spins)
  • Taikyoku sono san ura (with spins)
  • Pinan sono ichi ura (with spins)
  • Pinan sono ni ura (with spins)
  • Pinan sono san ura (with spins)
  • Pinan sono yon ura (with spins)
  • Pinan sono go ura (with spins)

Southern Kata

The southern Kata have their origins in Goju Ryu karate, which Oyama learned while training under So Nei Chu and Gogen Yamaguchi.

  • Sanchin (translation: three points or three battles)
  • Tsuki no kata  (Translation: punching Kata)
  • Gekisai Dai (Translation: Attack and Smash)
  • Gekisai Sho  (Translation: Attack and Smash)
  • Tensho   (Translation: Revolving Hands)
  • Saifa  (Translation: Smash and Tear Down)
  • Seienchin (Translation: Grip and Pull into Battle)
  • Seipai (Translation: 18 or 3×6 (has significance in Buddhism)
  • Yantsu (Translation: Keep Pure)

Kyokushin unique Southern Kata

The kata Garyu (translation: Reclining Dragon) is not taken from traditional Okinawan karate but was created by Mas Oyama and named after the village where he was born in Korea. The kata Yantsu is also often believed to be an original Kyokushin kata but there is enough evidence to suggest it finds its roots in Okinawa before Oyama created Kyokushin.

Put a little Jump in it…

ktadmin Posted in Fitness, Technique, Training notes,Tags: , ,
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Just put a little Jump Rope in your workout today…Stamina, Strength and Jump Strength!

 

The 3 K’s of Kyokushin

ktadmin Posted in Styles, Technique, Training notes,Tags: , , , , , ,
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I train in and teach Kyokushin Karate. One of the things that I love about my style is the simplicity of it all. Yes you read correctly. At its core Kyokushin training consists of three main elements: (1) technique, (2) forms, and (3) sparring. These are sometimes referred to as the three “K’s” after the Japanese words for them: kihon (technique), kata (forms), and kumite (sparring).

Kihon (technique):

Technique is everything in Karate.  Some may disagree with that but without technique you can not gain perfection.  Masutatsu Oyama, once said that after 1,000 repetitions one could say that one could perform a given technique. Only after 10,000 repetitions could one say that one had mastered it. Some students may think that they master certain move more quickly however the premise is correct.  To many student rush their training, like a race to the black belt, of course they could not rush their training if they did not have a willing Sensei.  Part of the mastery of technique in the martial arts is a mastery of self, which leads to perfection of form.  If someone tells you they attained their black belt in 2 years (730 days) or 3 years (1095 days) ask how often they trained.

Kata (forms):

Kata is the synergy or technique and skill.  Performed correctly the student will visualize his/her opponents for each move and execute each step with the appropriate power, speed and focus.  Masutatsu Oyama was slightly more generous with forms; saying that after 1,000 repetitions one could say that one had mastered a given form. Since Kata is technique in motion and if we focus on technique first this statement makes sense.  I equate Kata to dance or moving meditation, like either the movements must be fluid and natural, which can only be accomplished with a quiet mind.  When we first begin to learn a Kata we must think to learn the succession of movements but with continued practice the moves should become instinctive, second nature.  Only then can the Kata begin to flow as an expression perfect technique in motion.  Many discount Kata because they don’t see the immediate benefit of performing Kata, yet those with patience learn from Kata, clarity of mind, new applications of old techniques, and gain muscle memory for most situations.  Kata is the core of training the Martial Arts mind and sense.

Kumite (sparring):

Kumite or Sparring is the goal for some students and the bane of others.  Regardless of your motivation for practicing the Martial Arts sparring is critical to maturing your skills.  Some students and instructors believe in full-contact sparring from the beginning, if you are in the Military or live in DC then I would agree, but for most students this can lead to very bad habits and flinching.  Like training in Kihon and Kata training that progresses is better.  I prefer to start students sparring with defined rules, including light contact, defend only, hands only, or feet only.  In this way students are provided a safe environment where familiarity and trust is built with themselves and their fellow students.  Trust is important.  Most students have day jobs or classes and are ill served with facial bruises or broken bones.  Control of one self means having the ability to inflict equally a light strike or rib crushing blow.  While students need to understand what it feels like to get hit and how to take a hit, they need to be ready for it both physically and mentally.  Sparring should be frequent and fun.

These are my thoughts and experience with the 3 Ks, be flexible and adaptable in your training for tunnel vision is something you want in your opponent not yourself.

Burning Stomach Fat – Work that Core

ktadmin Posted in Fitness, Recipes and Health Facts, Technique, Training notes,Tags: , , , , ,
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There are many exercises we can employ to help us burn fat, but as we discussed in this previous post we need to build muscle if we really want to burn those fat cells off!  Many people think they need to work their abdominals to get their six-pack abs but the forget the curtain of fat that is sitting in front of their stomach muscles.  We need to strengthen our whole body, not just our abdominals and in the process of getting stronger we will be reducing that padding that is hiding our six-pack abs.  As a Martial Artist you need to make sure you are also strengthening the muscles supporting your abdominals, this will give you more power and help you to better “take a hit”.

Here are a couple exercises to get us started as we work into a stronger body.

Bicycle Crunch:

This exercise like so many is all about having the proper form.  Bicycle crunches were deemed the best ab exercise by the San Diego State University.  This exercise will work all the muscles in your abdomen including those supporting your six-pack.

  • Start by lying on your back on the floor or mat
  • Lie on your back with knees bent and calves parallel to the floor
  • Cup your ears loosely with your hands
  • Move your legs in a bicycle motion (elbows to opposite knees)
  • Keep your heels four inches off the floor
  • Every knee touch equals one repetition

Don’t try to do these really fast, keep a steady pace, remember you will only be cheating yourself.  Remember to alternate sides so you get a balanced workout.

It is important that you do not pull your head forward as this can cause injury or stress to your neck. Notice in the image that the hands are not interlocked, they are touching the side of the head to prevent you from accidentally pulling on your neck.  You’ll feel this one working right away.


This next one always makes me smile because it reminds me of a toddler throwing a tantrum!  When I was first introduced to this exercise I have to admit to mocking the value of this exercise, then I tried it…I’ve been a believe ever since!

Alternating Superman:

This exercise gets its name from the initial position because you lie on the ground like Superman flying in the air, minus the cape (hopefully).  Now you are ready to start…

  • Lying face down on a mat with your arms stretched above your head (like superman)
  • Raise your right arm and left leg about 5-6 inches off the ground (or as far as you comfortably can).
  • Hold for 3-15 seconds and relax.
  • Repeat with the opposite arm and leg.

Notice that you keep your head down during this exercise. Do not raise your head and look up, this will potentially injure or strain your neck.

If you find this to difficult you can modify this exercise by doing it on all fours (knees and hands).  From this position raise your opposite arm and leg out as straight as possible.  You should form a straight line from foot to hand.  Eventually you will get strong enough and can switch to the lying position.  As the exercise becomes easier, increase the amount of time you hold the position until you reach 60 seconds.

This one is great for your abs and your lower back.  While this is easier on your lower back then some exercises, if you have back problems start slow and see how your body handles it.


Keep reading as I will be posting more exercises to help you build muscles and burn fat.

Some of these exercises to reduce abdominal fat may make you wish that you had never set out to learn how to burn stomach fat in the first place, but the results will make it all worth it in the end!

Please check with your doctor before beginning any health and fitness program.

The Most Powerful Martial Arts Attack

ktadmin Posted in Competition, Styles, Training notes, Video,Tags: , , ,
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This is an awesome video presentation of various styles and Martial Arts strikes and kicks. While they attribute power to specific styles the important thing to note is the power of the specific attacks used since most styles include all of the attacks demonstrated (at least mine does!)